31 मार्च 2017

Sun-tzu makes you focus on the circumstances, and how you can approach them from angles. What is indirect creates less resistance. Indirection is subtle, like the flowing of the unorthodox out of the orthodox and vice versa. It is what is least expected.

The ancient Chinese way of thinking is completely relational. Nothing is static. Things only have meaning in relation to one another. An event here will never mean the same if it happens there. This is opposed to the Western way of thinking (I am overgeneralizing), which tends to create dualisms and absolutes.

Sun-tzu sees everything in fluid terms. Nothing is absolute, except one simple premise around which everything else revolves: the art of war is winning with minimum bloodshed, and minimum violence. This has a Confucian, ethical element to it, but it is also pure strategy and very Chinese. Winning with violence creates a countercurrent that causes you more problems in the long run. War is inherently more dangerous than life itself (the violence of life), because it is more unpredictable, creates more chaos in its wake. The brake on this is your ability to minimize the chaos, the variables by lowering resistance in your path. Violence and overt aggression only increases resistance.

Sun–tzu is a true strategist, as opposed to the usual type we find who simply regurgitates some preconceived maxims, or the kind of mindless military jargon we see nowadays. He makes you focus on the circumstances, and how you can approach them from angles. What is indirect creates less resistance. Indirection is subtle, like the flowing of the unorthodox out of the orthodox and vice versa. It is what is least expected.

I love Sun-tzu’s brutal language (I am sure it is not given anything close to justice in modern English), and this universe he has created in the remarkably dense 13 chapters. It is like a Zodiac, or the 64 hexagrams of the I Ching. He has created the universal patterns for all conflict. Your mind must raise itself up to this higher stratosphere of strategic thought. From there, you will respond with intelligent action, with sound tactics. It is almost too banal to even express, but those running businesses or wars are rarely strategists, but rather tacticians who know how to disguise themselves. That abstract realm of thought that must preface all intelligent action is missing. If only everyone really read Sun–tzu, really pondered what he said, as opposed to digesting him because it seems cool or warlike.

He is the god of strategists, and all of the rest of us are mere demigods or mortals. (Musashi is one of the highest of the demigods, in my cosmology.) I reread The Art of War every few months, so that I keep his ideas constantly in my mind. 
Robert Greene in an interview.

Read more -https://www.sonshi.com/robert-greene-interviews.html

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